Sunday, 21 March 2010

Merrills Marauders


jap tank authenticast


1/72 Italian Company Waterloo has done Marines







The great Jeff Chandler as Merrill The movie isn't given enough credit in Sam Fuller's filmography, probably because it doesn't showcase the director's flamboyant tabloid sensibility. It's one of the best films about extreme combat situations, and shows Fuller perfectly capable of doing well with material not of his own devising. Frank Dow Merrill was born in Woodville, Massachusetts, United States, descendent of British settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the 1600s. In his teenage years, he worked for United Fruit Company on a freighter as a radio operator, and then enlisted in the US Army while still underage.

Merrill's Marauders is also noted as the last film appearance of star Jeff Chandler, who weathered the hostile shooting conditions only to fall, at age 42, to complications from a botched surgery to repair a back problem. Chandler was publicly mourned at the next year's Academy Awards, before obituaries were a common theme of the ceremony.



Frank Merrill  held every enlisted rank as well as the officer rank of lieutenant and had experience in Haiti and Panama before gaining entrance into the United States Military Academy at West Point. His poor eyesight was cited as the reason for repeated refusal, but he finally gained entrance after receiving presidential appointment.Early 1944, Merrill became the head of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), a unit modeled after British General Orde Wingate's expeditionary force Chindits which penetrated deep into Japanese lines to disrupt communications. Merrill's unit would later gain the name Merrill's Marauders. Colonel Charles Hunter was assigned to the 5307th as the senior officer under Merrill; Hunter described his commanding officer as "rather tall, he was by no means a rugged individual, being narrow of chest and rather thin. His features were sharp but his nature ebullient, affable and confident." The first Marauder campaign took place in late Feb 1944 as they attacked the Japanese 18th Division at Walawbum, allowing Stilwell's regular units to take control of the Hakawing Valley










The hysterical American vesus the non-hysterical (possibly lobotomized?) American.




The idea of living in a country where guns are a part of culture would leave me cold. The owners of guns are basically afraid, they are afraid of the immigrants, afraid of the testo "wife" and thus having to endure a life of fear they have a well honed method, hysterical outpourings against everyone, so what is now a well-established method of the right wing exhausts me. The method is HYSTERIA, as if you have not noticed. This is what they are hysterical about:





and this





and this





and this





and this





and this
and especially their her indoors





obama is taking our firepower. He's a commie!!!!!We don't mind our taxes going to corporations and banks but fire will rain from the heavens if we actually get something for our tax dollars, like health care.


Obama's health care plan includes the sexual molestation their "her indoors". Obama wants their walmart "Her Indoors" with baseball bats.Is this it now?They EVEN, and this is really funny, think Obama is radical.


 The state of political of dialogue in America is putting right-wing oakies  on televsion  where they vomit ridiculous crap from them holes in their faces in an effort to get the most stupid of our nation riled up.  And guess what? its the most entertaining comic act since Tom Lehrer wrote National Brotherhood week.One week of every year is designated National Brotherhood Week.





" This is just one of many such weeks honoring various worthy causes. One of my favorites is National Make-fun-of-the-handicapped Week which Frank Fontaine and Jerry Lewis are in charge of as you know. During National Brotherhood Week various special events are arranged to drive home the message of brotherhood. This year, for example, on the first day of the week Malcolm X was killed which gives you an idea of how effective the whole thing is. I'm sure we all agree that we ought to love one another and I know there are people in the world that do not love their fellow human beings and I hate people like that. Here's a song about National Brotherhood Week.









Oh, the white folks hate the black folks,



And the black folks hate the white folks.



To hate all but the right folks



Is an old established rule.







But during National Brotherhood Week, National Brotherhood Week,



Lena Horne and Sheriff Clarke are dancing cheek to cheek.



It's fun to eulogize



The people you despise,



As long as you don't let 'em in your school.







Oh, the poor folks hate the rich folks,



And the rich folks hate the poor folks.



All of my folks hate all of your folks,



It's American as apple pie.







But during National Brotherhood Week, National Brotherhood Week,



New Yorkers love the Puerto Ricans 'cause it's very chic.



Step up and shake the hand



Of someone you can't stand.



You can tolerate him if you try.







Oh, the Protestants hate the Catholics,



And the Catholics hate the Protestants,



And the Hindus hate the Muslims,



And everybody hates the Jews.







But during National Brotherhood Week, National Brotherhood Week,



It's National Everyone-smile-at-one-another-hood Week.



Be nice to people who



Are inferior to you.



It's only for a week, so have no fear.



Be grateful that it doesn't last all year!








I be afraid,and you  be very afraid, in fact, feel free to get hysterical about it.


cos one day one of the loons might just get to be the boss



Sunday, 14 March 2010

list of model soldiers

Dear Client Here is a part of my list. Please keep coming back to this page as I will now be adding every week. There is a lot more b ut heres a sample.



A.Range.

superb figures at superb prices each (unpainted)one is £5.95 plus free posting.Mounted are 10.95 plus free posting These figures are second to none anywhere on the market. Great detail and action based for 54mm wargaming as well. Painted figures are 10 pound each and are done in a basic style. If you want Museum level we will quote you. New subjects are the furtherance of the Napoleonic range plus Napoleonic London volunteeers. We want to enlarge the Sahara range as well.The Mexican war range will have more figures but the present figures are being phased out.



list of sales

French and British Napoleonic



french voltigeur firing standing

french voltigeur loading

french voltigeur running attacking with bayonet

french voltigeur falliing wounded



british rifleman loading

british rifleman ready to fire

connaught ranger running with bayonet outstretched

coming soon more figures such as Naval infantry and Welch fusiliers. plus london volunteers



FRENCH IN THE SAHARA 1918-1925

French Foreign Legion standing firing Lewis from hip (taken from film March or die)

we are adding

MEXICAN WAR 1845

Six different U.S infantry in prussian style caps

Five different Mexican infantry in shakos

Three different US Mounted

Three different Mexican mounted

INDIAN MUTINY

three infantry figures are available

FIRING RIFLE REGULAR INFANTRY

FIRING COLT (in production)
RIFLE BRIGADE FIRING

OFFICER WITH SABRE

OFFICER WITH FLAG

MOUNTED OFFICER WITH SABRE



SUDAN

LANCER (Kit form. Not easy to put together)



Famous Figures. These figures are finishing .They will not be replaced All have wooden base plus engraved inscription. Foot are 3.50 Mounted are 7.00. These figures are show figures as the wooden base is of Museum quality.

Painted.



Murat

Pontianowski on horseback

Nelson

Messina

Napoleon on horseback



Toy Soldiers. All £4 each painted



1. Japs attacking with blanket roll running with bayonet.1900's

2. Garibaldini attacking running with bayonet

3.French Voltigeurs Solferino 1859 attacking bayonet or firing

4.Napolitan inf 1852 attacking bayonet or firing

5.Bersaglieri attacking bayonet

6.Garibaldi mounted

7.French officer 1859 Solferino mounted

8. Austrian inf stndg firing , Solferino 1859 (in production)

9.French foreign legion 1859 Solferino Stndg firing or attacking

10. French Foreign Legion advancing bayonet Solferino 1859

11. As above but for Sahara 1890 (in production)

12.Cacciatori Algerians Solferino 1859 (in production)1859. attacking

13. Victorian Rifle regt 1865. Standing at attention

14 Scots waterloo marching

15.USA Zouaves marching

16. US Marines ACW

17.Ellsworth Zouaves marching

18.German attacking ww2 with stick bomb

19.ACW Rebels marching

20.Prussian Guard 1914 in dress uniform



to order =send in first instance e.mail to me

Sunday, 7 March 2010

RIO CONCHO 2



FORT CONCHO. Fort Concho, in San Angelo, was one of a number of United States military posts built to establish law and order in West Texas as settlers began to move in after the Civil War. A site at the juncture of the Main and North Concho rivers was selected in November 1867 for a new post to replace Fort Chadbourne, which lacked an adequate water supply. Company H of the Fourth United States Cavalry arrived there in December. The post's first commanding officer, Capt. George Gibson Huntt, named the post Camp Hatch after the commander of his regiment, Maj. John Porter Hatch. Later it was called Camp Kelly for the recently deceased Maj. Michael J. Kelly, and in March 1868 the post became Fort Concho, named after the Middle and North Concho rivers, which converge in San Angelo to form the Concho.apacheFort Concho's commissary storehouse (today the oldest building in San Angelo) and its twin, the quartermaster storehouse, were constructed in 1868. Subsequent construction progressed slowly because building materials not available locally had to be hauled from the Gulf Coast by oxcart. An official report in 1876 stated that "a flat, treeless, dreary prairie" surrounded the fort, but Capt. Robert G. Carter recalled Fort Concho in the 1870s as "one of the most beautiful and best ordered posts on the Texas border. Its arrangement was artistic and every feature bespoke comfort and convenience. On the south side of the ample parade grounds stood the officers' quarters, tasty, elegant, imposing; on the north, the commodious and handsome barracks; on the east side the commissary and quartermaster's buildings, while the west side of the grounds was closed with an ornamental fence with a large gateway in the center." Civilian stonemasons and carpenters from the Fredericksburg area were employed in the early years of construction, and soldiers built the later buildings. The government did not buy the land on which the fort was built but leased it from private owners.By 1879 Fort Concho was an eight-company post with some forty permanent structures built of locally quarried limestone around a parade ground that measured about 500 by 1,000 feet. Besides the buildings mentioned by Carter, the fort's stone buildings included stables, blacksmith and carpenter shops, a forage house, an ordnance storehouse, a guardhouse, a powder magazine, a pump house, a bakery, a hospital, an administration building, and a schoolhouse that was used also as a chapel. A number of temporary frame buildings-married soldiers' quarters, telegraph office, and post trader's store-were built adjacent to the fort. The fort was not stockaded, but stone walls surrounded the hospital and the backyards of the officers' quarters. A belvedere on the post hospital afforded a distant view in every direction.Fort Concho was commanded by such famous officers as William R. Shafter, Ranald S. Mackenzie, Benjamin H. Grierson,qqv John P. Hatch, and Wesley Merritt.


While in command of Fort Concho, Colonel Grierson also commanded the District of the Pecos throughout the existence of that military jurisdiction in far western Texas (1878–81). Fort Concho served as regimental headquarters for the Tenth United States Cavalry, known as the Buffalo Soldiers, from 1875 until 1882.


The Fourth Cavalry headquarters was at Fort Concho for several brief periods between 1868 and 1873. The Eleventh Infantry was headquartered at Fort Concho in 1870 and the Sixteenth Infantry from 1882 until 1887. Units of the Third, Eighth, and Ninth United States Cavalry regiments and of the Tenth, Eleventh, Nineteenth, Twenty-fourthqv, and Twenty-fifthqv United States Infantry regiments also served the garrison, along with signal corps personnel, who managed telegraph and weather service.sary was sometimes supplemented from the post garden at nearby Bismarck Farm or purchased from the sutler's store. Grain and meat were contracted from local suppliers. Hunting parties killed buffalo and turkeys when possible. Drinking water came from a clear-running spring three miles south of Fort Concho, and water for cooking, washing, and aniSoldiers from Fort Concho scouted and mapped large portions of West Texas; built roads and telegraph lines; escorted stagecoaches, cattle drives, and railroad survey parties; and served generally as a police force. At times Fort Concho troops were stationed at semipermanent subposts at Grierson's Spring, Camp Charlotte, and the head of the North Concho. Among the numerous temporary field camps were several former Butterfield Overland Mail stops such as Johnson's Station, Grape Creek Station, and old Fort Chadbourne.

















Fort Concho's commissary storehouse (today the oldest building in San Angelo) and its twin, the quartermaster storehouse, were constructed in 1868. Subsequent construction progressed slowly because building materials not available locally had to be hauled from the Gulf Coast by oxcart. An official report in 1876 stated that "a flat, treeless, dreary prairie" surrounded the fort, but Capt. Robert G. Carter recalled Fort Concho in the 1870s as "one of the most beautiful and best ordered posts on the Texas border. Its arrangement was artistic and every feature bespoke comfort and convenience. On the south side of the ample parade grounds stood the officers' quarters, tasty, elegant, imposing; on the north, the commodious and handsome barracks; on the east side the commissary and quartermaster's buildings, while the west side of the grounds was closed with an ornamental fence with a large gateway in the center." Civilian stonemasons and carpenters from the Fredericksburg area were employed in the early years of construction, and soldiers built the later buildings. The government did not buy the land on which the fort was built but leased it from private owners.


hill







By 1879 Fort Concho was an eight-company post with some forty permanent structures built of locally quarried limestone around a parade ground that measured about 500 by 1,000 feet. Besides the buildings mentioned by Carter, the fort's stone buildings included stables, blacksmith and carpenter shops, a forage house, an ordnance storehouse, a guardhouse, a powder magazine, a pump house, a bakery, a hospital, an administration building, and a schoolhouse that was used also as a chapel. A number of temporary frame buildings-married soldiers' quarters, telegraph office, and post trader's store-were built adjacent to the fort. The fort was not stockaded, but stone walls surrounded the hospital and the backyards of the officers' quarters. A belvedere on the post hospital afforded a distant view in every direction.


mounted infantry







Food from the commissary was sometimes supplemented from the post garden at nearby Bismarck Farm or purchased from the sutler's store. Grain and meat were contracted from local suppliers. Hunting parties killed buffalo and turkeys when possible. Drinking water came from a clear-running spring three miles south of Fort Concho, and water for cooking, washing, and animals was abundant in the nearby rivers.


Concho







Fort Concho was commanded by such famous officers as William R. Shafter, Ranald S. Mackenzie, Benjamin H. Grierson,qqv John P. Hatch, and Wesley Merritt. While in command of Fort Concho, Colonel Grierson also commanded the District of the Pecos throughout the existence of that military jurisdiction in far western Texas (1878–81). Fort Concho served as regimental headquarters for the Tenth United States Cavalry, known as the Buffalo Soldiers, from 1875 until 1882. The Fourth Cavalry headquarters was at Fort Concho for several brief periods between 1868 and 1873.

 The Eleventh Infantry was headquartered at Fort Concho in 1870 and the Sixteenth Infantry from 1882 until 1887. Units of the Third, Eighth, and Ninth United States Cavalry regiments and of the Tenth, Eleventh, Nineteenth, Twenty-fourthqv, and Twenty-fifthqv United States Infantry regiments also served the garrison, along with signal corps personnel, who managed telegraph and weather service.


timpo







Soldiers from Fort Concho scouted and mapped large portions of West Texas; built roads and telegraph lines; escorted stagecoaches, cattle drives, and railroad survey parties; and served generally as a police force. At times Fort Concho troops were stationed at semipermanent subposts at Grierson's Spring, Camp Charlotte, and the head of the North Concho. Among the numerous temporary field camps were several former Butterfield Overland Mail stops such as Johnson's Station, Grape Creek Station, and old Fort Chadbourne.


chadbourne







In the early years of the fort's existence, its soldiers skirmished with numerous small parties of Indians. Fort Concho also furnished personnel and supplies for three major Indian campaigns: Mackenzie's 1872 campaign, the 1874 Red River War, and the Victorio campaign of 1879–80. In 1872–73 more than 100 Indian women and children captured by Mackenzie were imprisoned in a stone corral at Fort Concho for six months. Other important Fort Concho events include the 1875 exploration of the Llano Estacado by Colonel Shafter and Capt. Nicholas Nolan's expedition of 1877n 1870 a town, which later became San Angelo, began to form across the river from the fort. As civilian law enforcement improved, Fort Concho ceased to be of any value as a military post; from 1882 to 1889 the fort was mainly a holding point for soldiers awaiting reassignment.

The army abandoned the fort on June 20, 1889. Most of its buildings escaped demolition by being converted into civilian housing and commercial storage space.

 In 1929 Ginevra Wood Carson headed a fund-raising campaign to buy the former Fort Concho administration building. She had established the West Texas Museum in 1928 in a room of the county courthouse.



 In 1930 she moved her museum into the newly acquired building and changed the name to Fort Concho Museum. The city of San Angelo took over the operation of the museum in 1935 and began a program of land acquisition and building restoration. By the mid-1950s the city had acquired several fort properties and had rebuilt two barracks and two mess halls from ruins. The fort was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961, and its first master plan for reconstruction was prepared by the National Park Service in 1967. Besides museum exhibits and living history programs, Fort Concho hosts a variety of community activities.


Friday, 5 March 2010

US CAVALRY 1840'S



THIS IS ONE OF MY PRODUCTS THAT WILL NOT BE REDONE.BUY NOW.VERY FEW LEFT VERY FEW MADE .MOULDS WON'T BE USED AGAIN MOST LIKELY

GOSHAWK SQUADRON


Crescent





Rug Woolley is the  commanding officer of Goshawk Squadron.Its kill the fucking Germans in any which way . Shoot them in the back, machine gun them on the ground but do it so they can't kill you.


 Stan Wooley the bastard of Goshawk Squadron knows they'll all be dead in 6 weeks anyway. Shortlisted for Britain's esteemed Booker Prize, Derek Robinson's book is the greatest ever done about war in the air .


You'll never believe the old bullshit of Knights with wings once you have read this.









(ricavata da Amazon Thu, 07 Jan 2010 21:10:41 -0500)